From fantasy to historical fiction is quite a jump. Making it all up versus all that research and getting the facts right would not have been my first choice for future books. Then I fell across Emma Beach, a fellow Australian who had spent several years researching the tragedy of Elizabeth Scott, the first and youngest ever woman to be hanged in Melbourne, Australia, in 1863.

The Shanty Keeper’s Wife

Australian High Country 1863

Child-bride Betsy has grown into the pretty wife of an abusive, drunken owner of an illegal grog shanty. When he’s murdered, her ex-pirate cook is quickly arrested. But rumours of ‘too close an intimacy’ between Betsy and a youthful groom soon lead to their arrest also.
Convicted on hearsay and gossip, Betsy will hang – unless one man tells the truth.

Very few people have heard of Elizabeth Scott, tried in 1863 along with her ex-pirate cook and an 18 year-old groom who lodged with the family for the murder of her drunken, abusive husband. That included me before I came across Emma Beach’s novel drafts on a peer review website. Emma’s family hails from the area where the murder happened – the chimney of the illegal grog shop (shanty) where it took place still stands. We became collaborators on the book. We’re still writing it and Emma is still digging up new and fascinating facts. And we’re on the hunt for a publisher!

Read an extract from The Shanty Keeper’s Wife here.

The picture is a watercolour by ST Gill. Elizabeth’s first marital home, where she bore five children of whom only two lived, would have looked like this.


Keepers

Raine didn’t plan to marry Teddy. His moods turn on a hairpin, he’s hotheaded and easily offended. But he’s the father of her unborn child, and in 1950s Australia being an unwed mother isn’t an option. She marries him, determined to make it work, only to see him abandon her a year later for the wilds of the Snowy Mountains. When Raine realises she is bearing their second child, she decides to hunt Teddy down. She needs to look him in the eye and test the truth of their love. Because Raine’s true keeper might not be Teddy; he might be the caring and careful Alf – Teddy’s cockney childhood friend and Raine’s not-so-secret admirer.

Keepers is currently being queried.

I entered Keepers in a novel competition last year and was thrilled with the feedback:
Excellent writing and intriguing opening. Convincing feel for the domestic setting but full of intriguing questions. Interesting structure too. Modest* story … written with great skill. 

* This, I am told, is a publishing term for a book which isn’t full of explosives and frantic action. You can read an extract from Keepers here.