If you would tell me the heart of a man, tell me not what he reads, but what he rereads. Francois Mauriac

Not so much reviews as what I’ve enjoyed (or in a few cases not enjoyed). I have eclectic tastes but what marks a good book for me is being able to sink into the writing. I’ll put up with writing I can’t quite get on with if the story really reels me in, but I’ll read the slowest novel ever if I love those words. I’m catching up here for the time being, posting when I get a chance the books I’ve enjoyed over the last year or so…quite a few!

‘What makes life worth living, and what do you do if you find it isn’t?

This is part of the jacket blurb for William Boyd’s latest novel, Trio. In the turbulent year of 1968, three people, all with secrets, are struggling to find the answer to this question – although for one it comes late in the story.
Talbot, ex-army, decent man, a film producer is struggling with a growing number and severity of problems, not all of his own making.
Elfrida, once feted novelist now wordless alcoholic, is in denial.
Anny, international film star, appears to make bad man-decisions, although right now she has the chance to perhaps make up for that. If she doesn’t blow it.
All three are linked to a very Sixties-style film being made in Brighton in the summer, along with a cast of well-drawn fellow characters. ‘The tangled webs we weave’ could have been Boyd’s title for this story which is almost voyeuristic in how closely the reader gets into the characters’ heads. Talbot was the one I was rooting for. Is it all happy endings? It’s Boyd, with his wry humour, nuanced approach to people and perfectly detailed plots. Love him as always.

Trio, William Boyd

‘…how little we know of other people’s lives, even our own parents. Perhaps especially our own parents.’

Cath Barton’s novella, published in Nov 2020, is a sensitive and beautifully written insight into the lives of Ted and Rene. They marry in the ‘frail optimism’ of the 1950s, she to take up the expected role of mother and housewife, he to continue with his career as a ceramics designer in the family firm. Over time, misunderstandings and the inability to talk to each other drive a wide wedge in their marriage. While to everybody else, including their own daughters, the couple appears perfectly devoted to each other, inside it’s a different matter.

I devoured this, both for its humanity and its writing.

In the Sweep of the Bay, Cath Barton

My name is Anna Winterbourne. I do not hold (much) with those who talk of the Stars governing our Fate’

Ahdaf Soueif’s The Map of Love was first published in 1999. I didn’t remember reading it when I picked it from the book shelf looking for something before my new books arrived. No recollection either as I started it, but about half way in, a ticket to the Valley of the Queens tumbled from the pages and I recalled finally that I’d taken it with me when visiting Egypt in January 2001. A good choice, as Soueif’s deep knowledge of the country of her birth enriches these pages so that you feel you are truly there, especially the old Egypt. The story carries two timelines – the first in 1906 when Lady Anna Winterbourne, widowed, travels to Egypt to help her recovery from her husband’s death. There she falls in love with the country and with Sharif, a wealthy and fiercely nationalistic Egyptian landowner. In 1997, their descendants and those of Sharif’s sister, come together after decades of not knowing of each other’s existence. The story is told through modern and historic eyes, and what comes across strongly is the saying: the more things change, the more they stay the same.
There is a lot about Egyptian politics, both the British occupation and that towards the end of the 20th century. Fascinating to learn about. In between there is a beautiful old love story, and a more pragmatic modern one. Highly enjoyable.

The Map of Love , Ahdaf Soueif

Learned a lot about white magic, whether true or not, it was nicely portrayed

I enjoyed this book as a pleasant read, and certainly loved the 17th century Gideon, Bess and Ann story. I thought it became more melodramatic rather than dramatic as it moved on, and the WW1 story didn’t move me at all. Well, the horses did, of course. I’m a fan of magical realism and my own current work in progress has themes vaguely related to this book. I appreciated the way Brackston delved deep into wiccan lore and tradition – whether it’s correct or not, who cares, but certain aspects of the magical elements are beautifully portrayed, eg the wild animals (also a vague theme in my Guardians series where the young protagonist can understand the wild creatures and recruits them to her cause). What I would have liked is more subtlety and emotion around the later time tales and the ending rather than straight descriptions of people floating 10ft in the air and too obvious dialogue. Not sure I would buy more but if someone gave me another of hers I wouldn’t complain.


The Witchs Daughter Paula Brackston


You don’t have to be a Greek legend expert to enjoy this brilliant book

A well-deserved international best-seller, I loved Madeleine Miller’s straightforward, no-nonsense Circe. An outsider from birth, neither powerful nor beautiful, Circe’s true power lies in something the gods fear – witchcraft. Exiled to her island, Circe is content, until the arrival of Odysseus.
While the tale is engaging, a ‘must read on into the night’, it’s the language which totally won me over.
‘Gods love novelty, as I have said. They are as curious as cats.’
And there we have the gods relegated to child status, not to be taken seriously. Except … one must.
And when Circe first discovers her ability with flowers and changes Glaucos into a god – ‘… his blue chest, strapped with god muscles, and … his hands, smooth as surf-rolled shells.’
Surf-rolled shells. Sigh.
I have yet to read Song of Achilles, probably about time I did.


Circe Madeleine Miller


Everyone from age seven upwards should read this

My granddaughter at age ten is a keen and productive writer. Her stories (and re-writes of mine) are highly imaginative and pacy, with characters who leap off the page and into all kinds of trouble. I was looking for books for her and came across Coraline, which was published after my own passed the age where they might have read this.  An avid Neil Gaiman fan, it struck me as just the thing. I had to read it first before giving it to her (naturally) so we could talk about it, and I thoroughly enjoyed it although wondering what impact its nightmarish qualities might have on young children!
The scary passages are genuinely scary:
‘…it scuttled down the darkened hall fast, like a little patch of night.’
There’s heartbreak too when Coraline’s parents fail to appear. Coraline has been brave, making herself a meal, running a bath, putting herself to bed. But, at 3.12 am –
‘All alone, in the middle of the night, Coraline began to cry. There was no other sound in the empty flat.’
I genuinely worried about Coraline, more than she does herself, and feared for her parents.
The cat who helps out in the other place and was simply a cat in the normal (note I don’t say ‘real’) world is brilliant. Doubtless I’m late to the party but if you haven’t yet discovered Coraline, and whether or not you have the excuse of children, grandchildren, nieces and nephews, godchildren etc, read it!


Coraline Neil Gaiman


Not sure this would turn me into a Matt Haig fan…

While I have nothing to complain of in terms of the writing, I was disappointed in this. A woman at death’s door – having attempted suicide because life is basically shit and she’s thrown away every opportunity to live a different life – is offered the chance to go back, do things differently and settle for a life in which she’s truly happy.
Guess what? All those regrets she’s been carrying around turn out to have been damn good decisions after all. So where is her true chance of happiness? I won’t give away the ending but you can probably guess.
The reappearance of her old librarian friend as her mentor (I guess) through her journeyings added little to the story – a convenient person for the MC to complain to as it turned out. And the appearance of another person living the same experience added nothing and was in my view a great romance opportunity lost (as in the classic Replay).
The MC seemed to me too self-obsessed. It wasn’t even that she’d had a terrible life to bring her to the suicide point but perhaps I’m being too harsh.

The Midnight Library Matt Haig


Beautifully written study of the human state in its many frailities and some strengths

A novel worthy of its best seller status. The narrator, Danny, never really knew the mother who left her two small children and her husband to work with the poor in faraway India. She’s something of a saint to the two women now entrusted with Danny and his sister Maeve’s upbringiug. Maeve, much older, misses and blames her mother and their once warm father grows distant from his children. But whatever contentment the household has is cracked by the arrival of Andrea, splintered further when Andrea marries the father and brings her two daughters to live in the house, and finally shattered when the father dies and everything – the house, his business, even Maeve’s car – is left to his new wife.
The house – the Dutch house of the title – is where Danny and Maeve have always found solidity and comfort, but it is Andrea’s desperate wish to live in and own the house itself for its glorious over the top nature, which destroys their comfort and might destroy their lives.

The Dutch House, Ann Patchett


I loved this for so many reasons, chief among them being its total unashamedly ‘Australian-ness’

Frankly I’m surprised anyone who hasn’t lived in Australia understands what’s going on, there are so many unique references and they’re important to the book. But apparently this hasn’t stopped Bridge of Clay becoming a best seller. From sisters (The Sisters Grimm), I turned to brothers – five of them, living not so ordinary lives in a Sydney suburb behind a race track. The narrator, the oldest brother Matthew, tells the tales of his mother, father and the fourth brother with exquisite emotional detail. There are no heroes here, just people who hurt a lot and act accordingly, including selfishly. But resilience is at the core of this book and Clay’s bridge is a wonderful metaphor. Loved it. (But if you’re expecting a repeat of The Book Thief, forget it!)

Bridge of Clay Marcus Zusak


What do they remember? Will it be enough to save them and those they love?

I had this book on my TBR pile for some time and almost forgot about it until it popped up somewhere at the same time I needed to get in more reading material. So glad I added it to the order. Four eight-year-old sisters, all born on the same night, play in a white forest where they learn they have different, powerful skills -one can fly, one has a way with water, one with fire and the fourth with earth and rocks. But as they reach puberty they must leave the forest for a time and they forget … their power and their sisters.

Now, approaching their 18th birthdays, they must find each other and rediscover who they are – Sisters Grimm, born of one demanding father – if they are to have any hope of saving themselves and those they love.

Not completely a happy ending, but a satisfying one. I see there is a sequel coming out next year.

The Sisters Grimm Menna Van Praag


Winter, 1617. The sea around the remote Norwegian island of Vardø is thrown into a reckless storm. A young woman, Maren, watches as the men of the island, out fishing, perish in an instant. Vardø is now a place of women.

For a time at least, and the women find it tough but are managing. Then comes ambitious Absalom Cornet with his reforming zeal and iron morals. He has brought with him a young wife, Ursa, more used to civilised life as a merchant’s daughter in Bergen. Ursa needs a friend and she finds one in Maren, a woman of the island. Their friendship is fraught, two women from very different cultures, and it plays out to a dramatic end.

I was there on that bleak island with those women – Hargrave’s beautiful writing vividly brings their lives to light from the smallest domestic detail to their deepest emotions.

The Mercies reminded me strongly of my own The Shanty Keeper’s Wife with its theme of how women come to be blamed so easily for the sins of men.

The Mercies Kiran Millwood Hargrave

London, 1826 Frannie Langton is about to be tried for the murder of her master and mistress, Mr and Mrs Benham. But Frannie loved her mistress – how could she have murdered her?

Frannie Langton is born on a Jamaican plantation to a black slave and the master of the house, John Langton. As such she is neither slave nor free and has but one real friend in this world. When her father teaches her to read, Frannie discovers he is not acting from any alturistic motive. As a girl still she is sent to London to serve as the maidservant of Mrs Benham, whose husband is Langton’s ‘medical experiment’ partner. A deeply shocking and involving book, written with a sharp conciseness which allows us to get inside Frannie’s head and suffer with her. A must read for any lover of historical fiction and mystery.

The Confessions of Frannie Langton Sara Collins

A bee, a key and a sword – clues on the cover of a strange book which will lead Zachary Rawlins into a labyrinth of stories and to Mirabel and Dorian.

I loved The Night Circus so this was a natural for me when it came out not too long ago (there appears to be no date on my hardback, signed copy and I wonder if this means something??) This is a book to take your time over, to curl on the sofa with the dog at your feet and/or the cat on your lap and fall into this world alongside the curious Zachary. A kind of grownup and highly expanded Alice in Wonderland, with gorgeous writing and – is there a plot? – yes, I think so. One to read again to find all those things you missed the first time. Pure pleasure.

The Starless Sea, Erin Morgenstern

‘Our Dragon doesn’t eat the girls he takes …’

How can you not read a book with that opening line? It sets the tone of the world Naomi Novik builds so skilfully, a world where the Dragon – an ageless wizard – has protected Agnieszka’s village from the horrors of the Wood since time out of mind. He has a price however, and that’s for one girl from the village to serve him for ten years. Agnieszka is born in the right, or perhaps wrong, year to be a candidate but all expect him to take Agnieszka’s best friend, the prettier and brave Kasia. When he chooses her, Agnieszka embarks on a new life which is as demanding as it is – in the end – worth all her pain and despair.

A rollicking pace, alive characters and a story to keep your heart in your mouth, I loved Uprooted. And also Novik’s more recent Spinning Silver which makes you wonder what does go on in this author’s head.

Uprooted Naomi Novik